PHOTOS: Hurricane Irma

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A street is flooded near the ocean after Hurricane Irma passed through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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Umbrellas held by Janesse Brown, left, and her daughter Briana Johnson, 12, right, get torn apart by strong winds as Kyra Johnson, 8 watch, while they tried to visit Southbank Riverwalk in Jacksonville, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017, as Hurricane Irma passes the area. (Bob Self/The Florida Times-Union via AP)

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A downed tree lies across Cape Coral Parkway during Hurricane Irma in downtown Cape Coral, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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A car drives through a flooded street after Hurricane Irma passed through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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Water floods a street in a business district after Hurricane Irma passed through Naples, Fla., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

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Corrugated iron hangs wrapped around an electricity pole one day after the passing of Hurricane Irma in Remedios, Cuba, Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Desmond Boylan)

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Brian Baker, of Valrico, Fla., cuts up an Oak tree that fell across Falling Leaves Drive after Hurricane Irma passed through the area, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, in Valrico, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

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A car sits in a flooded parking lot outside the Germain Arena, which was used as an evacuation shelter for Hurricane Irma, which passed through yesterday, in Estero, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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Evacuees leave the Germain Arena, which was used as an evacuation shelter for Hurricane Irma, which passed through yesterday, in Estero, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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In this Sept. 8, 2017 photo, people walk near debris in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Tortola, in the British Virgin Islands. Britain has sent a navy ship and troops to help people on the British Virgin Islands, Anguilla and the Turks and Caicos islands that were pummeled by the hurricane. (Gabi Gonzalez via AP)

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Men wade through a flooded street, caused by the passing of Hurricane Irma in Havana, Cuba, early evening Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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Evacuees stand in line to enter the Germain Arena, which is being used as a fallout shelter, in advance of Hurricane Irma, in Estero, Fla., Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. With the window closing fast for anyone wanting to escape, Irma hurtled toward Florida with 125 mph winds Saturday on a projected track that could take it away from Miami and instead give the Tampa area its first direct hit from a major hurricane in nearly a century. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

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Strong waves brought by Hurricane Irma hit the Malecon seawall in Havana, Cuba, late Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

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Waves crash against the Southernmost Point in Key West, Fla., Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. Hurricane Irma's leading edge bent palm trees and spit rain as the storm swirled toward Florida on Saturday. (Rob O'Neal/The Key West Citizen via AP)

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Storm clouds associated with the outer bands of Hurricane Irma shroud the downtown skyline Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017, in Tampa, Fla. Several parts of the Tampa Bay area are under a mandatory evacuation order for the approaching storm. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

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A palm tree lays on a car after the passage of Hurricane Irma, near the shore in Marigot, on the island of St. Martin, Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. The island is divided between French St. Martin and Dutch Sint Maarten. (AP Photo/Amandine Ascensio

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Damaged buildings and fallen trees litter downtown Marigot, on the island of St. Martin, after the passing of Hurricane Irma, Saturday, Sept. 9, 2017. On the Dutch side of St. Martin, an island divided between French and Dutch control, an estimated 70 percent of the homes were destroyed by Irma, according to the Dutch government. The island is divided between French Saint-Martin and Dutch Sint Maarten. (AP Photo/Amandine Ascensio)

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Residents come out to survey the damage caused by Hurricane Irma in Nagua, Dominican Republic, Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. Irma cut a path of devastation across the northern Caribbean, leaving thousands homeless after destroying buildings and uprooting trees. Irma flooded parts of the Dominican Republic when it roared by Thursday, just off the northern coast of the island it shares with Haiti. (AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)

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This Sept. 7, 2017 photo provided by the Dutch Defense Ministry shows storm damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, in St. Maarten. Irma cut a path of devastation across the northern Caribbean, leaving thousands homeless after destroying buildings and uprooting trees. Significant damage was reported on the island that is split between French and Dutch control. (Gerben Van Es/Dutch Defense Ministry via AP)

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This Sept. 6, 2017 photo provided by the Dutch Defense Ministry shows storm damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, in St. Maarten. Irma cut a path of devastation across the northern Caribbean, leaving thousands homeless after destroying buildings and uprooting trees. Significant damage was reported on the island that is split between French and Dutch control. (Gerben Van Es/Dutch Defense Ministry via AP)

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This Sept. 6, 2017 photo shows storm damage in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in St. Martin. Irma cut a path of devastation across the northern Caribbean, leaving thousands homeless after destroying buildings and uprooting trees. Significant damage was reported on the island known as St. Martin in English which is divided between French Saint-Martin and Dutch Sint Maarten. (Jonathan Falwell via AP)

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Mayor William Ivan Solis inspects a home damaged by Hurricane Irma, in the island of Culebra, Puerto Rico, Thursday, September 7, 2017. About a million people were without power in the U.S. territory after Irma passed just to the north, lashing the island with heavy wind and rain. Nearly 50,000 also were without water. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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A pleasure boat stands next to a destroyed home after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in Culebra, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. About a million people were without power in the U.S. territory after Irma passed just to the north, lashing the island with heavy wind and rain. Nearly 50,000 also were without water. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Devastated buildings from the island of Culebra, which suffered damages by the passage of Hurricane Irma, are seen form the air, in Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. About a million people were without power in the U.S. territory after Irma passed just to the north, lashing the island with heavy wind and rain. Nearly 50,000 also were without water. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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Juan Negron, right, prepares to start up a power generator in front of whats left of his damaged property, after the passage of Hurricane Irma, in the island of Culebra, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017. About a million people were without power in the U.S. territory after Irma passed just to the north, lashing the island with heavy wind and rain. Nearly 50,000 also were without water. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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People make their own sandbags to protect in their homes before the arrival of Hurricane Irma in Las Terrenas, Dominican Republic, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Dominicans are getting ready for the arrival of Hurricane Irma after battering Puerto Rico with heavy rain and powerful winds, leaving more than 600,000 people without power as authorities struggle to get aid to small Caribbean islands already devastated by the historic storm.(AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)

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Motorists head north of Tavernier, Fla., on US 1, in anticipation of Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Keys officials announced a mandatory evacuation Wednesday for visitors, with residents being told to leave the next day. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

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Jesse Dewey fills sandbags at a public works site as he prepares for Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, in Casselberry, Fla. Throughout Florida, officials and residents are making preparations, but forecasts indicate the Keys could take the country's first blow from the Category 5 storm. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

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People walk out with water and necessities in preparation for the arrival of Hurricane Irma on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in North Miami. Heavy rain and 185-mph winds lashed the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico's northeast coast Wednesday as Hurricane Irma roared through Caribbean islands on its way to a possible hit on South Florida. (David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP)

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Traffic is seen heading North along the Florida Turnpike near Homestead, Fla., as tourists in the Florida Keys leave town on Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Heavy rain and 185-mph winds lashed the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico's northeast coast Wednesday as Hurricane Irma roared through Caribbean islands on its way to a possible hit on South Florida. (Al Diaz/Miami Herald via AP)

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Employees of of the Courtyard Marriott Hotel board up windows as they prepare for the arrival if Hurricane Irma, in San Juan Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 6 2017. Heavy rain and 185-mph winds lashed the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico's northeast coast as Irma, the strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane hurricane ever measured, roared through Caribbean islands on its way to a possible hit on South Florida. (AP Photo/Danica Coto)

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A man surveys the wreckage on his property after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Heavy rain and 185-mph winds lashed the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico's northeast coast as Irma, the strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane ever measured, roared through Caribbean islands on its way to a possible hit on South Florida. (AP Photo/Johnny Jno-Baptiste)

 

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A woman pushes out floodwaters on her property after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Heavy rain and 185-mph winds lashed the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico's northeast coast as Irma, the strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane ever measured, roared through Caribbean islands on its way to a possible hit on South Florida. (AP Photo/Johnny Jno-Baptiste)

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Sophia Johnson, 6, talks to her mom, Kace Johnson after they finished filling 10 sandbags with dirt provided by Sarasota County at the Newtown Estates Recreation Center, Wednesday, Sep. 6, 2017, in Sarasota, Fla., as the family prepares for Hurricane Irma. The Johnsons got the last ten sandbags Wednesday shortly after noon, before the county ran out of sandbags. The county had plenty of dirt, but people had to start bringing their own bags or containers. The county was expecting another delivery of sandbags on Thursday. (Mike Lang/Sarasota Herald-Tribune via AP)

 

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James Byrd, left, and Richard Clark, right, load their sandbags in a truck Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, at Newtown Estates Recreation Center in Sarasota, Fla., as they prepare for Hurricane Irma. The each got their ten bags before Sarasota County ran out of sandbags for residents. The county still has plenty of dirt but residents must bring and fill their own bags. A new shipment of sandbags is expected Thursday. (Mike Lang/Sarasota Herald-Tribune via AP)

 

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People recover broken parts of the dock after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Heavy rain and 185-mph winds lashed the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico's northeast coast as Irma, the strongest Atlantic Ocean hurricane ever measured, roared through Caribbean islands on its way to a possible hit on South Florida. (AP Photo/Johnny Jno-Baptiste)

 

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A couple arrive at a store to purchase supplies in preparation of Hurricane Irma in Carolina, Puerto Rico, on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Carlo Guisto)

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This Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017 satellite image provided by NASA shows Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean. Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba and a possible direct hit on South Florida. (NASA via AP)

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Shoppers wait in line for the arrival of a shipment of water during preparations for the impending arrival of Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 in Altamonte Springs, Fla. Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its 185-mph winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hispaniola and a possible direct hit on densely populated South Florida. (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

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Kailey Coventry walks past empty shelves of water at Target in Gainesville, Fla., on Wednesday, Sept. 5, 2017. "Hurricanes are always super last minute but I just want to make sure I'm prepared," said Coventry. Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its 185-mph winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hispaniola and a possible direct hit on densely populated South Florida. (Andrea Cornejo/The Gainesville Sun via AP)

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People stand near the shore before the arrival of Hurricane Irma, in luquillo, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its 185-mph winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hispaniola and a possible direct hit on densely populated South Florida. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

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In this GOES-13 satellite image taken Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017 at 7:15 a.m. EDT, and released by NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Hurricane Irma tracks over Saint Martin and the Leeward Islands. Hurricane Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its 185-mph winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, Cuba and Hispaniola and a possible direct hit on densely populated South Florida. (NASA/NOAA GOES Project via AP)

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Max Garcia, of Miami, waits in a line since dawn to purchase plywood sheets at The Home Depot store in North Miami, Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Florida residents are preparing for the possible landfall of Hurricane Irma, the most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

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Kelby Schweickerrt, of Destin, Fla., grabs some gallon jugs of drinking water from the shelves at the Target store in Destin, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (Michael Snyder/Northwest Florida Daily News via AP)

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Kimberly Wraight fills her sandbag at Lealman Community Park, in St. Petersburg on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. Wraight is caring for her 88-year-old father, who is blind and does not want to leave the house. (Lara Cerri/The Tampa Bay Times via AP)

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Jackie Kreuter, 56, of Gulfport, Fla., tosses pool furniture in the pool Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017 so it doesn't fly around during the impending hurricane. Kreuter, along with her mother, husband, sister, daughter, grandson, five dogs and a bird are boarding up their home and business and leaving for Ocala to get out of Hurricane Irma's way. (Lara Cerri/The Tampa Bay Times via AP)

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Gas station employee Albert Fernandez covers a pump after running out of gas as the demand for gas has increased due to Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, in Key Largo, Fla. Irma roared into the Caribbean with record force early Wednesday, its winds shaking homes and flooding buildings on a chain of small islands along a path toward Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba and likely Florida by the weekend. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

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A semi truck drives in front of a group of men as they place plywood over a store's windows, before the arrival of Hurricane Irma in Las Terrenas, Dominican Republic, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017. Dominicans are getting ready for the arrival of Hurricane Irma after battering Puerto Rico with heavy rain and powerful winds, leaving more than 600,000 people without power as authorities struggle to get aid to small Caribbean islands already devastated by the historic storm.(AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)

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Erik Budman drills a nail into the plywood as he prepares for Hurricane Irma, at a local business, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, in Key Largo, Fla. Hurricane Irma grew into a Category 5 storm, the most powerful seen in the Atlantic in over a decade, and roared toward islands in the northeast Caribbean Tuesday on a path that could eventually take it to the United States. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

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Motorists head north on US 1, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, in Key Largo, Fla., in anticipation of Hurricane Irma. Keys officials announced a mandatory evacuation Wednesday for visitors, with residents being told to leave the next day. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

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Steve Leibowitz works on his hurricane shutter at his home as he prepares for Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, in Key Largo, Fla. Hurricane Irma roared into the Caribbean with record-setting force early Wednesday, shaking people in their homes on the islands of Antigua and Barbuda on a path toward Puerto Rico and possibly Florida by the weekend. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

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FILE - In this Aug. 25, 1992, file photo, rows of damaged houses sit between Homestead and Florida City, Fla., after Hurricane Andrew struck. After a catastrophic Hurricane Andrew revealed how lax building codes had become in the country's most storm-prone state, Florida began requiring sturdier construction. Now, experts say a monstrously strong Hurricane Irma could become the most serious test of Florida's storm-worthiness since the 1992 disaster. (AP Photo/Mark Foley, File)

Description

Several are readying themselves for Hurricane Irma as others deal with the aftermath.

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